A Foreigner at Home: When Your Accent Works Against You

Growing up in the American south, I was always acutely aware of accents. I can remember clearly my mother scolding me for adding extra syllables to words, an unmistakable twang that betrayed me as an Alabama girl. “The word is ‘bat’!” she would say. “Not ‘bah-yat’!” I went to an expensive prep school, well known […]

https://shesnolady.wordpress.com/2015/05/06/a-foreigner-at-home-when-your-accent-works-against-you/

How to write your own EFL materials: Part Two – Thinking about context and flow

Oxford University Press

EFL coursebook writingJohn Hughes has co-authored a number of titles for OUP including three levels in the Business Result series, Successful Meetings, and Successful Presentations. He will be giving a practical workshop on how to write materials at the upcoming BESIG conference in Bonn on 15th November. This is the second of two blog posts in which John explores three key areas which he believes underpin effective materials writing.

In part one of my blog on this subject, I wrote about the importance of writing materials at the correct language level and cognitive level, as well as writing exercises and tasks at an achievable level. In this next post I want to consider the importance of context and flow in the writing process.

Creating context

Context is the second area of EFL materials writing that affects how and what you write. By ‘context’ I’m referring to a number of different elements: First…

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International Symposium on Monolingual and Bilingual Speech 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS

International Symposium on Monolingual and Bilingual Speech 2015 (ISMBS 2015)

The Symposium will host a multidisciplinary forum for the exchange of ideas on monolingual and bilingual speech. Theoretical, experimental, observational, and computational contributions are welcome for oral or poster presentations that may be on:

– speech acquisition and use
– monolingual speech
– bilingual and multilingual speech
– child speech development
– adult and child L2 speech
– dialectal speech
– pronunciation learning and teaching

– normal and disordered speech
– language maintenance, loss and attrition
– speech perception and production
– speech processing
– atypical speech development and disorders – speech and hearing impairment
– speech remediation

regarding phonology, phonetics, clinical phonetics, psycholinguistics, speech pathology, acoustics, speech physiology, neurolinguistics, methodological advancements, computational advancements, applications of new technologies.

The language of the Symposium is English. Oral presentations will be 30 minutes long including discussion. Poster presentations will not be concurrent with oral presentations.

Abstract Submission

Abstracts consist of 350 – 450 words (main body) and 3-7 keywords. They should not exceed one A4 page including references. The format is: 12 point Times New Roman font, single- lined, margins set to 2.54 cm (1 inch) all around. Doulos SIL (http://scripts.sil.org/DoulosSILfont) is to be used for phonetic symbols. Abstracts should be submitted as email attachments in both word and pdf versions to: submit@ismbs.eu between 10 October 2014 and 10 February 2015. The word version must include name(s) of author(s), affiliation(s), and email address(es), while the pdf version excludes all these. Preference for oral or poster presentation is indicated at the bottom of the abstract. Previously published works, including own, must be cited using name and year in parenthesis.

Paper Submission

For publication in the ISMBS 2015 Proceedings, full papers will be submitted after the Symposium, by 30 October 2015. Selected papers will be further considered for publication in an edited book and journal special issue.

Important Dates
Abstract submission: 10 October 2014 – 10 February 2015 to: submit@ismbs.eu Notification: by 10 March 2015

7-10 September 2015, Great Arsenali Conference Center, old Venetian harbor, Chania, Crete, Greece (www.ismbs.eu)

EdTech is Widening Skills and Achievement Divides. Why Not Narrow the Engagement Divide?

What do you think, after having done Module 8?

Open Assembly Blog

This work, “Kids at computer,” is a derivative of “Kids using the computers.” by San Jose Library, used under CC BY/Cropped from original This work, “Kids at computer,” is a derivative of “Kids using the computers.” by San Jose Library, used under CC BY/Cropped from original

Despite efforts to provide technology access to poor and minority students and narrow the “digital divide,” educational tech may not be leveling the playing field after all.

A recent Hechinger Report story focuses on research conducted in two polar-opposite Philadelphia neighborhoods over a 10-year period. Susan B. Neuman of New York University and Donna C. Celano of LaSalle University studied academic and economic inequalities between children from affluent Chestnut Hill and those from struggling Kensington. They explored how kids used computers at public libraries, where they discovered just how differently poor and affluent students took advantage of the tech resources.

Chestnut Hill kids often went to the library with adult family members, who sat with them and answered questions or directed them to educational material. In contrast, the Kensington children tended to lose focus and interest while using the computers, and…

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Tell it Again!…

Tell it Again! The Storytelling Handbook for Primary English Language Teachers

Submitted by ellenpd on 19 June, 2014 – 17:46

By Gail Ellis and Jean Brewster

This new revised edition of ‘Tell it Again!’ shows how a story-based methodology brings together the best of primary English language teaching and the rich and motivating resource of children’s literature.

Picture storybooks and the technique of storytelling provide teachers with an attractive and appealing resource for meeting the diverse needs of children in the primary English language classroom. Tell it Again! first published in 1991 as The Storytelling Handbook, has now been republished in its third edition. There have been minor revisions and updated sections on using learning technologies, creating an inclusive learning environment and references and further reading.

Tell it Again! provides a comprehensive methodology section and story notes on 12 stories from around the world. For each story there are a series of lesson plans with photocopiable activity sheets. The stories include ten of the most popular Puffin storybooks as well as two stories that can be copied.

You can download this publication in pdf format below.
Publications:

Tell it Again! The Storytelling Handbook for Primary English Language Teachers

Submitted by ellenpd on 19 June, 2014 – 17:46

By Gail Ellis and Jean Brewster

This new revised edition of ‘Tell it Again!’ shows how a story-based methodology brings together the best of primary English language teaching and the rich and motivating resource of children’s literature.

Picture storybooks and the technique of storytelling provide teachers with an attractive and appealing resource for meeting the diverse needs of children in the primary English language classroom. Tell it Again! first published in 1991 as The Storytelling Handbook, has now been republished in its third edition. There have been minor revisions and updated sections on using learning technologies, creating an inclusive learning environment and references and further reading.

Tell it Again! provides a comprehensive methodology section and story notes on 12 stories from around the world. For each story there are a series of lesson plans with photocopiable activity sheets. The stories include ten of the most popular Puffin storybooks as well as two stories that can be copied.

You can download this publication in pdf format below.
Publications:

Tell it Again! The Storytelling Handbook for Primary English Language Teachers

Submitted by ellenpd on 19 June, 2014 – 17:46

By Gail Ellis and Jean Brewster

This new revised edition of ‘Tell it Again!’ shows how a story-based methodology brings together the best of primary English language teaching and the rich and motivating resource of children’s literature.

Picture storybooks and the technique of storytelling provide teachers with an attractive and appealing resource for meeting the diverse needs of children in the primary English language classroom. Tell it Again! first published in 1991 as The Storytelling Handbook, has now been republished in its third edition. There have been minor revisions and updated sections on using learning technologies, creating an inclusive learning environment and references and further reading.

Tell it Again! provides a comprehensive methodology section and story notes on 12 stories from around the world. For each story there are a series of lesson plans with photocopiable activity sheets. The stories include ten of the most popular Puffin storybooks as well as two stories that can be copied.

You can download this publication in pdf format below.
Publications:
Books and resource packs

A full text book to download to learn more about how to use storytelling at primary levels to teach English.

McMillan Seminar on speaking

Skills with Macmillan English Campus: listening and speaking training

Date/Time
Date(s) – 25/06/2014
10:00 am – 11:00 am

Categories

Join us for a training session to make the most of listening and speaking activities on the Macmillan English Campus!

Macmillan English Campus contains a multitude of activities designed to help students develop and practise language skills. In this training session, we’ll be focusing on listening and speaking; locating suitable activities and suggesting ways in which they can be used.

Included in the session will be roleplays, the new teacher-marking feature and Integrated Skills Activities, plus plenty more.

Sign up for this skills training session on listening and speaking.

Once registered, you will receive an email confirmation that contains a link to the online session.

This training session is for institutions using Macmillan English Campus. If you are not yet using the English Campus and would like a demonstration, you can sign up here.

*(The time for this session is currently in UK time, BST.)

http://www.macmillanenglishcampus.com/news-events/events-calendar/skills-with-macmillan-english-campus-listening-and-speaking-training/

Group 5

The use of ICT to improve different aspects of; Reading, writing,  , speaking and culture.

 

What is ICT: ICT stands for “Information and Communication Technologies.” It refers to technologies that provide access to information through telecommunications. This includes the Internet, wireless networks, cell phones, and other communication mediums.

According to ELMO educational ICT tools can be divided into 3 categories: Input source, Output source and Others.

ICT has increasingly been brought into play in the education of students inside and outside the classroom. It has created an much more interactive and dynamic form of learning.

 

ICT is widely use in many areas or sectors such as education, economy, politics and social throughout the world. It is now very common to be used within schools. Many countries now regard understanding ICT as part of the core of education, alongside writing, reading and numeracy. The emergence of ICT has made an improvement on the education for every student as it brings a lot of advantages for every student.

It has been cited that using ICT within the classroom environment by allowing them to acquire the skills they need to help them in later life when they are looking for a job.

Writing

I have been reading an interesting article on the use of ICT to inspire writing for children.

Visual Media such as film and animations can help engage and inspire writing in many different ways. Children nowadays often access stories via media and they are often the starting point for children when they want to garner interest in a certain story. Having the immediate audio and visual can have a huge impact in giving children ideas for their writing. For example, watching a film can subliminally give children an excellent idea of a scenario in their head, and this is evident through their writing.

 

The central thesis to the impact of ICT, with regards the cultivation of written skills, is the successful combination of curricula and the preexisting influence of, and fascination with, technology, especially computers.  An important factor in this is the reality that students spend protracted periods of time with technology on a daily basis, and by employing computers in the classroom a teacher can increase the enthusiasm and effort of a class.

Utilising ICT in the classroom is an easy and effective method of engaging students, with research indicating written skills in particular are improved as a result.

 

In some specific areas there is cumulative evidence of the positive impact of ICT on learning. One such area is word-processing. A systematic review concluded that on average, students who use computers when learning to write are not only more engaged and motivated in their writing, but they produce written work that is of greater length and higher quality.[1]

 

This does not necessarily vindicate the ICT approach entirely over rival methodologies, but it does adequately represent its candidacy for inclusion in written exercises

[1] Higgins, Steve, Does ICT Improve Learning and Teaching in Schools http://www.bera.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/ict-pur-mb-r-f-p-1aug03.pdf

[1]

Reading

 

In tandem with written skills, student interaction with computers can yield greater progress with reading skills, simply due to the sheer convenience and customisability of ICT resources. Teachers can personalise every aspect of reading exercises to assist in the appraisal of tests, thus providing more incisive information to inform student feedback, and thereby eschewing the traditional limitations of conventional paper and pencil exams.

“With the use of ICT, teachers can more easily and efficiently give personally created assessments. Web-based quiz creation programs enable teachers to create quizzes for students to take and review online […] Teachers may choose different options such as time limits, number of questions per page, size of print, ability for review before posting, possibility for re-takes, and whether students receive feedback. All these options allow teachers to customise quizzes to the needs of their students.[1]

 

ICT can also heavily influence a student’s ability to read phonics, thus improving not only reading but speaking fluency.

 

Programs such as the Mindplay reading evaluation tests students with a series of phonics and comprehension questions. The phonics portion is analysed for errors, then tells the teacher exactly where the problems are. For example, it might say that the students have difficulty with short vowel distinction or difficulty forming plurals. In comprehension, it calculates performance on the reading passages and estimates approximate reading level.[2]

 

With this manner of classroom assistance a teacher can better identify class shortcomings and where improvement must be made, and therefore present better informed and devised lessons in future; purchase appropriate supplementary resources; or seek additional assistance if necessary. The overall identification of student levels is rendered more accurate than just a single person’s opinion based on proprietary traditional style reading comprehensions.

 

            The use of ICT is an effective way for teachers to teach students to read. Examples such as talking books and text to speech software provide students with the motivation necessary to learn to read. Additionally, learning to read hypermedia [the internet, electronic texts, etc.] gives students the skills they need to find information in our electronic world. ICT in reading is critical for all students living in the digital age.[3]

 

[1] Korabiak, Kathryn & Mete, Nicole, ICT in the Discipline of Reading http://pages.uoregon.edu/moursund/DigitalAge1/Project-Reading.pdf

 

Listening

Listening has been defined as simply “part of the communication process” and takes on four aspects:

Hearing: relating to prior knowledge

Understanding: affected by social and cultural background

Interpreting: affected by personal experiences, age, gender, cognitive, ability

Assimilate: ability to construct knowledge

 

There are also different types of Listening used both inside and outside of schools. These consist of Comprehensive listening which involves understanding content and information, Critical listening used to evaluate information or an opinion on what they have heard and finally active listening which is based around formulating understanding or building knowledge from analysing information that has been given to them.

 

Using ICT within classrooms to help students with their listening skills has many positive effects.  By listening to different kinds of speakers it allows the students to overcome some obstacles that they may face in everyday situations. These includes things such as different types of vocabulary that they were not previously aware of, the speakers voice, the speed of speech and of course different accents. It also allows the students to hear how English words are pronounced as one of the main problems within Spain is that most English teachers are not native speakers and are teaching their students the wrong pronunciation. It can also break up the lesson. The last thing students want is to sit for an hour simply getting dictated at by their teacher.

 

This is an excellent example (see below)  of how the students can get involved in activities helping their listening skills. Not only can the students turn into the “DJ” (thus practicing their oral), the radio can play English songs and stories etc for the students to grasp. This is also a way the students learn whilst having fun.

Culture

What is culture? There are many definitions of culture but one is “the combination of human knowledge, beliefs and behavior that we learn and pass on to future generations.”[1]

 

It is important to not only to learn a language, but also the culture of the people who speak it. It teaches the students how to go outside their cultural ‘comfort zone’ and it teaches them that not everyone is the same and that there is much to see and learn.

 

ICT has been a huge help in bring other cultures into the classroom. With the use of videos, stories and email pen-pals etc. we are able to introduce a new cultures and information that the students would not have been able to grasp properly just hearing about it second-hand from a teacher or reading about it.

Children can now take virtual tours of museums or famous sights, for example, A Virtual Tour of Auschwitz/Birkenau at http://www.remember.org/auschwitz/ or Le Louvre Museum at http://www.louvre.fr/en/visites-en-ligne.

Students can also access fairytales from other countries, learning about the morals, traditions and ideals of another culture. An example would be applications such as Rabia the hen, an interactive bilingual story, from Terry lab http://terrylab.com/en/index.html.

Students can also learn about the history and culture of other countries through interactive websites, which also benefit the students in the improvement of other areas such as reading and listening comprehension. For example, this website that tells the stories and histories of the aboriginal people with an interactive interface, videos, quizes and much more http://www.abc.net.au/dustechoes/dustEchoesFlash.html.

 

ICT is bringing different cultures to life for the children. It makes it much more interesting and engaging than just reading about it in a book. Now they can see and explore themselves in a fun way.

Speaking

 

In the classroom, ICT allows children greater opportunities for sustained forms of talking through things such as asking and answering questions. It is also a very good resource to instigate a classroom debate amongst each other too. Furthermore, ICT is very useful for teaching phonics because it is easier for young learners to make a connection between sounds and letters/words on a page. It also provides more variety which is key for young learners when trying to learn something new. In classrooms nowadays, programmes such as Power Point are incredibly common. It is a fantastic tool in allowing children to learn independently, improve their ICT skills and to then improve their speaking and presentation skills at the end. It is a vital tool in every classroom.

 

If used and supported correctly, ICT is a fantastic commodity to have inside a classroom to help improve speaking. It can dramatically improve achievement levels, and inspire creative thinking. ICT can also help develop skills that nowadays will be completely relevant to their personal and professional life so it is very important that children acquire these skills as early as possible. Furthermore, ICT can minimise teacher preparation time whilst also inspiring pupils to learn.

 

[1]Global Citizenship & Youth Philanthropy    1 Module 1: Cross Cultural Understanding. (n.d.). . Retrieved May 14, 2014, from http://www.globalkidsconnect.org/activities/culture_lesson.do

 

References

 

  • ELMO (2012). What is ICT in education ? – “ICT”is Information and Communication Technology. “ICT in Education” means “Teaching and Learning with ICT”. Retrieved May 13, 2014, from http://www.elmoglobal.com/en/html/ict/01.aspx

This is the answer for team 2 / Project 8

Team 2 Project 8

Having spoken to ICT educators in my school, I have discovered  from the educators first hand experience and from reading numerous articles on the topic, the advantages and disadvantages of ICT.

Technology doesn´t stand still. It is constantly progressing meaning that as an ICT educator you must be constantly informed as to the latest developments in the technological world. Not only must they possess a flawless understanding of how the systems they are using work but they must be able to impart this knowledge upon their students before even attempting to teach the target subject. This means a dual learning within the class which, one could argue, is useful for the new society we find ourselves in. A society that has become ever more dependent on technological advancements and time saving programs.

Is using how to use an ipad the new handwriting class? Has manual writing become such an archaic form of…

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Emma Watson Graduates From Brown University

This could be a good article to comment with your students 😉

TIME

Emma Watson walked across the stage at Brown University on Sunday in Providence, R.I., where she graduated with a degree in English literature.

The renowned actress, who is most well known for her role as Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter franchise, has been enrolled at the institution since 2009.

Since beginning her studies at the highly venerated university, the 24-year-old Brit has also starred in five major Hollywood films.

[AP]

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The One Simple Thing That Can Make You Much More Impressive

TIME

Show More Enthusiasm

Professor Stephen Ceci taught his class the way he had for the past 20 years, replicating nearly everything imaginable:

Same book, same lectures, same exams… even the same student demographics.

Via The Tell: The Little Clues That Reveal Big Truths about Who We Are:

He took great pains to make sure everything else about the class was the same as it had been the previous fall; he used the same book, the same lectures, the same grading policies, the same exams, the same office hours, the same syllabus, and the same slides, videos, and transparencies, and the student demographics were the same. He listened to the audio recordings he had made of his fall lectures and tried to memorize each before delivering it in the spring. He used the same detailed outlines and transparencies to ensure he talked about the exact same content. At the end…

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